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Dynamic Observations of the Evolution of Firn

General

Organisation
Project start
01.01.2016
Project end
31.12.2019
Type of project
ARMAP/NSF
Project theme
Cryosphere
Project topic
Cryosphere

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 67.0179977417, -50.69400024414

Fieldwork start
03.06.2017
Fieldwork end
29.06.2017

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland Ice Sheet
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 72.57, -38.48

Fieldwork start
05.06.2017
Fieldwork end
23.06.2017

SAR information

Project details

16.11.2018
Science / project plan

.

Science / project summary
One important factor that controls ice sheet melt is its physical properties. Using modern microstructural characterization techniques, the PI will determine the mechanisms of ice core densification and microstructure evolution as a function of depth. An 80 meter firn core will be drilled at Summit, Greenland, and transported to Dartmouth College. For the shallow part of the core, where the firn is subjected to seasonal and diurnal temperature gradients, the PI will impose Greenlandic in situ temperature gradients at the core boundaries. Continuous X-ray micro-computed tomography (microCT) will be used to monitor densification and microstructure evolution. For the deep part of the core, a Greenlandic in situ temperature gradient does not exist over the length of the core. However, it does experience stresses from the weight of the overburden. The PI will therefore conduct in situ loading experiments on the deep core. Continuous microCT will be used to monitor densification and microstructure evolution. After the completion of the microCT experiments, the firn will be sectioned and examined in a cold-stage-equipped scanning electron microscope. Electron backscattering and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy will be used to determine ice crystal orientations and local microchemistry.
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