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Quantifying Rates of Biological Production to Better Understand the Carbon Cycle in the Canada Basin

General

Project start
01.01.2013
Project end
31.12.2015
Type of project
ARMAP/NSF
Project theme
Ocean & fiord systems
Project topic
Oceanography

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Arctic Oceans and various regions
Fieldwork region
Arctic (entire region)
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 71.35800170898, -143.97500610352

Fieldwork start
02.08.2013
Fieldwork end
02.09.2013

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Arctic Oceans and various regions
Fieldwork region
Arctic (entire region)
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 71.35800170898, -143.97500610352

Fieldwork start
01.01.2014
Fieldwork end
31.12.2014

SAR information

Project details

17.01.2019
Science / project plan

.

Science / project summary
The main objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the interplay between biological production, sea ice, and temperature in the Canada Basin. Adding on to collected data from 2011 and 2012, researchers will collect more samples in 2013 and 2014 and will interpret all the data in order to address two hypotheses. The summer of 2012 set a record for minimal sea ice extent. Comparisons of rates of net community production and gross primary production in 2011-2014 will allow examination of the change in productivity with sea ice conditions. Comparisons of rates of production within a given year at stations where ice is melting and at open water stations will allow investigation of productivity within areas of actively melting ice, i.e. ice edge blooms. A wealth of physical oceanographic information collected as part of the Beaufort Gyre Observing System will allow us to characterize the environmental setting in all three years. Additionally, researchers will “extend” the four-year time-series by comparing observed rates to those predicted by satellite algorithms and by working with modelers in order to incorporate the rates into ecosystem models of the Arctic Ocean.
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